Christos A. Ioannou

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Teaching Philosophy

I approach the course as a collaborative activity between the students and myself. The most important aspect of creating an effective learning environment is letting students know that I care and monitor closely their performance. To this end, I find it absolutely necessary to create an open and safe atmosphere where students know that their questions and ideas are encouraged and valued. In addition, I find it important to remain adaptable. This implies adjusting to different students and different universities in a manner consistent with the personality of the student or the culture of the university respectively. It also implies always recognizing that my teaching can improve. Thus, I always strive to make it better through constant monitoring and by continually exposing myself to outside input and new techniques.

In order to keep the class stimulating, I try to make it fun and lively. I integrate interesting and elucidating examples, pertinent to the students' personal lives to help them better-grasp abstract or theoretical concepts. I strongly encourage students to engage in classroom discussion and to ask questions. I begin each lecture with a brief summary of the material covered in the previous class. I feel that learning is maximized when the lectures are integrated. I find it useful to create a sense of continuity in the course by describing the relationship between current and past material, re-iterating the main points from current and past lectures, and pointing out common themes that run throughout the course.

The course syllabus is structured so as to provide students with a precise guide as to what they should read, and in what order. Historically, my courses tend to stick to the schedule outlined in the syllabus closely. Furthermore, through a carefully-chosen load of homework, quizzes and exams I try to maximize motivation, learning efficiency and understanding. Then, I combine testing of students' command of basic theory, methods and concepts with opportunities to apply these tools in real world situations. Also, I try to convey to students how economics is relevant to them and how the economic thought process is useful in their everyday lives. With such an array of diverse set of skills, I hope and aim at producing the complete student.